4 Comments

  1. Heya!!!!!!!!!!

    I think i would’ve enjoyed the Hilot more, but only because i think it’s akin to a soothing massage. 😛

    Ok i think i can’t kick your ass but i can still UFC you 😀

  2. Auraphil

    Hi Josiah & Readers,
    Hilot, I think as shown in picture is similar to the Japanese form of alternative medicine or therapy.

    Google: Shiatsu.Wikipedia

    It seems that the Filipinos learned
    something good during the Japanese
    occupation but do not know until now
    that this is good and even the name. Ha! Ha! This is very popular in North America and Europe.
    As to the “Manghihilot” not accepting
    Fees, I asked somebody when my sister
    visited a Manghihilot in Bagtong, Salcedo,E. Samar. They say that once
    Fees are asked, he/she loses his
    spiritual power to heal. I think
    this is again the superstitious Belief or carried on from the middle
    ages (Witchcraft) since Eastern Samar was occupied by some Europeans.
    Take note of the Waray language, there are many Spanish words. I even
    spoke some at a Market in Malaga, Spain. They understood some words. The Beliefs of earlier Filipinos believing in natural spirits (Anitos?), then the Middle Age Christian Beliefs of Witchcraft (time of (Joan of Arc?) plus Chinese/Japanese influences, are all
    mixed up today. Some Roots are still
    there.
    In many cases of local treatment using medicinal plants, there are
    more advantages than today’s modern
    medicine. My grandparents died at the
    age of over 80, without surgical operation at all. They still enjoyed
    eating “lechon” and drank “Tuba” up
    to their last days. We should ask the
    old Folks about their practices before they are forgotten, then pass the good ones to the Youth. There are
    many local plants growing around,they used to cure many Ailments, much
    effective perhaps than what we buy
    from the Drugstores.

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